I recently had the opportunity to chat with my friend Sandra Iminza Mukidza, a native of Kenya, about her food and culture. She was generous enough to share a couple of her traditional recipes, and let me pass them on to you!

I recommend setting aside an evening to experience a taste of Kenya! Maybe put on some African music, or pull up Out Of Africa on Netflix, spend an hour or two in the kitchen surrounded by the amazing smell of veggies and spices cooking away, and then dig into this delicious feast!

Kenyan Beef Curry at TasteOfThePlace.com

An Ideal Kenyan Dining Experience, According to Sandra

An ideal Kenyan dining experience would normally have a buffet of food laid out on the table together with plates and silverware placed on the table. Individuals would then get up and serve themselves from the table and go back to their rightful seating areas.

There are however certain parts of animal proteins that belong to different individuals, due to cultural beliefs.
I’ll give an example using my tribe – in the Luhya community, chicken is the most popular protein and in a dining set up it is the head of the house (a man) who eats the gizzard, drumsticks, and the back of the chicken. The women can eat the chicken wings and any other parts of the chicken. I phoned my grandmother to ask her the rationale behind this but she too could not explain.

Typical menu items include:

Kenyan Dishes to Try at Home

Kenyan Beef Curry

Loaded with ginger, garlic, red onions, and succulent beef, this Kenyan Beef Curry is full of flavor and savory goodness.

Grab the Kenyan Beef Curry recipe HERE


Ugali - a Kenyan Cornmeal Porridge

Simple and satisfying, this cornmeal porridge is the perfect accompaniment to soups, stews, and savory curries.

Grab the Ugali recipe HERE

Simple and satisfying, this cornmeal porridge from Kenya, called Ugali, is the perfect accompaniment to soups, stews, and savory curries.

Sukuma wiki

Sukuma wiki means to push or extend the week. It's a flavorful mix of hearty greens with enough oomph and flavor to carry a meal, even if the budget for meat has run out.

Sandra's delicious version of Sukuma Wiki - so tasty!
Sandra Iminza Mukidza

I am an amateur chef, a food stylist with a hospitality background, and a Jamie Oliver Food Revolution Super Ambassador. 

I discovered on my quest to find inner peace, that cooking has a more virtuous purpose than just the appeasement of one’s craving.

I realized that being in the kitchen always made me feel unflustered. I have now turned my kitchen into my own little playground where I test and recreate my grandmothers’ traditional recipes.

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Sukuma Wiki

Sukuma wiki means to push or extend the week. It’s a flavorful mix of hearty greens with enough oomph and flavor to carry a meal, even if the budget for meat has run out.

  • Author: Sandra Iminza Mukidza
  • Yield: 4 as a side 1x
  • Category: Side
  • Cuisine: Kenyan

Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 2 medium (or 1 large) red onions, finely diced
  • 1 pound kale, shredded into thin strips, toughest bits of stems discarded
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 cup heavy cream (also called heavy whipping cream) or double cream (do not substitute with whole milk)

Instructions

  1. Heat the 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet or pot over medium heat until shimmering. Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 to 7 minutes.
  2. Add the shredded kale to the onions and mix well. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  3. After 5 minutes, remove the lid, add salt to taste, and stir in the cream. Continue cooking for another 5 minutes, uncovered, stirring occasionally. The cream will thicken slightly, making for a deliciously rich creamed kale and onions. Yumm!
  4. Serve it up with your favorite Kenyan stew, and a side of ugali!

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